.............................

Why is language? Language is that we may mis-unda-stand each udda.

—Krazy Kat

.............................

Beauty has no evident usefulness, and yet without it, we could not endure our lives.

—Freud

.............................

Art does not reproduce the visible. Rather, it makes it visible.

—Paul Klee

.............................


.....................................................

Time, space, and colleagues in the beautiful Blue Ridge, spring 2012

Activities


.............................................................................

A boffo night in the East Village



.............................................................................

LATEST PROJECT: Writing that hits the mark.


New voices and acclaimed masters in an anthology of armed and dangerous American fiction.

.............................................................................

YOU WANT TO WRITE. BEGIN!
Start this fall with fiction classes at the Visual Arts Center.



The Course: 10,000 Monkeys with Typewriters


October 20–November 10, 2014
Imitation leads inevitably to originality; we’ll learn why—and how—in this writing class.

Unlike most other fiction courses offered in Richmond, or, for that matter, on earth, this writing class will explore originality through imitation. Participants need waste no time figuring out pesky problems of point of view, tense, voice, scene, and dialogue; they may even be able to skip plot.

As art students sketch in museums, we will emulate masters, following their line to free our work and surprise us. Exercises will be stimulating, classmates helpful, and the instructor expert, especially on language, litbiz, good jokes and bad.

.............................................................................

The course: Madman, Architect, Carpenter, Judge



What’s harder, beginning or continuing? Composing or revising? Structuring or polishing? Each aspect of writing presents its own difficulties. We commonly find ourselves tangled in doubt, or confused, or working at cross-purposes during each step of building a piece of writing. Each part of the process entails confusion; each also requires a different stance toward the work.

• The madman has plenty to say, so write first.
The madman doesn’t care how it looks or whether
grammar and spelling are perfect.

• The architect cares about structure; this comes next.
Your piece needs a beginning, a middle, and an end.
It needs a problem or conflict.
It must move—something has to happen.

• The carpenter cares about joints, fit, and finish.
The carpenter puts things together and makes sure they’re level, square, and tight.

• The judge cares about the details.
The judge inspects spelling, punctuation, grammar, and tone.
The judge double-checks for coherence and flow, catching infelicities or mistakes.


Bring paper and pencils, work, anxieties, misgivings, and questions. We will use them all.


.............................................................................

Occasional: Private Studio Classes, by invitation


Helpful, hand-picked colleagues; knowledgeable, sophisticated instruction; congenial surroundings.

.............................................................................

Everyone Needs an Editor



As you start . . .


• Developmental editing—
Before it's a book, it's an idea, a set of notes, an outline, a bunch of pages. Developmental editing takes it from these beginnings to a completed manuscript, with special attention to the project's
-structure
-content
-plot
-beginning and ending

.............................................................................

As you draft . . .


• Copyediting—
The editor helps the writer make sure the work is
-correct
-clear
-grammatical
-not wordy
-factually accurate
-readable
-meaningful

.............................................................................

After you've written . . .


Manuscript evaluation—
-Is it good?
-Is it ready?
-What now?
General Editing—
-grammar
-spelling
-syntax
-usage
Substantive Editing—
-organization
-coherence
Submission guidance—
-What to send
-Where to send
Consultation—
Proven, experienced guidance finding the right
– MFA program
– fellowship
– residency
– grant
Informed, sophisticated help—
-Crafting better applications
-Improving chances of success

To discuss or arrange evaluation,
editing, or consultation, click
e-mail.


.............................................................................

Anthologies

Fiction
Behind him, flashy in red Hong Kong sharkskin, loomed Staretz, Yacovlev, and Rodchenko. The custom suits couldn't contain the bulky bulges that made them all stand so awkwardly.
Chosen by The Iowa Review
Nat Tate was unreal. Hart Crane was real. The story is a fiction on a fiction, the brushy vital verge between fact and dream.
Chosen for this delicious anthology, "A Period of Silence" examines time’s meaning in a marriage.
Winner, STYLE Fiction Prize
The Georgia Review, fall 2009

Quick Links